• Deaf Action Center Empowering the Deaf Community since 1982.
  • Deaf Action Center Empowering the Deaf Community since 1982.
  • Deaf Action Center Empowering the Deaf Community since 1982.
  • Deaf Action Center Empowering the Deaf Community since 1982.
  • Deaf Action Center Empowering the Deaf Community since 1982.
  • Deaf Action Center Empowering the Deaf Community since 1982.
  • Deaf Action Center Empowering the Deaf Community since 1982.
  • Deaf Action Center Empowering the Deaf Community since 1982.

Deaf Action Center

Certification Testing

With new laws mandating qualified interpreting and the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, RID has developed standards of practice, including a code of ethics, for interpreters. A formal written examination and video-taped performance tests are the methods utilized to evaluate the skill of interpreter candidates. The Deaf Action Center has been designated a Super Site (Site #115), a satellite of RID, whereby a candidate may petition to take the RID written examination, and upon successful completion, evaluation of interpretation and transliteration skills.

The Center also serves as a testing site for the Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment developed by Brenda Schick and Kevin T. Williams. The Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment (EIPA) is a tool designed to evaluate the voice-to-sign and sign-to-voice interpreting skills of interpreters who work in the elementary and secondary school classroom setting.

The EIPA evaluates the ability to expressively interpret classroom content and discourse and the ability to receptively interpret student or teen sign language. It is not limited to any one sign language or system. EIPA is used to evaluate interpreters who work with students and teenagers who use predominately American Sign Language (ASL), Manually-Coded English (MCE) and Pidgin Sign English (PSE).

Areas the EIPA Does and Does Not Evaluate: Some professional skills can only be assessed by administrators/educators in the school district. The EIPA does not assess the interpreter’s performance as a member of the professional team, how well the interpreter performs as a professional (i.e., follows professional guidelines), or how well the interpreter completes duties other than interpreting, such as tutoring and aiding.

Interpreter Information Form